Winter Park Highlands Association
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>Grand County Emergency Services

The Grand Fire Protection District has lots of information on its website about emergency preparedness—check out www.grandfire.org. Click on the Public Information tab, then click on the Fire Safety and Prevention tab.  Under the heading Family Preparedness you will find two links, one to a document called “Why Prepare?” and one to a Supplies Kit Checklist

The website also contains helpful information on protecting your home should a wildfire strike.  Be prepared!  Check out the excellent brochure Wildfire, and the helpful cheat-sheet Get Ready!  

The Grand County Office of Emergency Management also has a helpful brochure called Emergency Information Resources.

Finally, you also might be interested in the detailed 12-page brochure entitled Ready, Set, Go! Your Personal Wildland Fire Protection Guide and a related video. Check them out!
>Grand County Burn Program (Grand County Burn Booklet)

Grand County runs its open burn season in the winter months when fire danger is low. The season opens when there is 3-6 inches of permanent snow on the ground county-wide, which is usually about mid-November, and closes around April 1, depending on the presence or absence of snow. A person wishing to burn must complete and receive an approved open burning permit from the Grand County Division of Natural Resources (GCDNR) prior to any slash pile burning where the pile exceeds 3 ft. diameter and 2 ft. tall.  Application forms are now available on the Grand County website. Please note that though the office is “closed” on the weekend, Grand County still runs the burn program via an on-call system so people can burn on the weekends. If you live within a town limit, please check with your local town hall for burning regulations as they will supercede the county regulations.

Copies of approved burn permits must be available on-site during the burning operation in case of complaint or inspection. Burning activities should also include plans for safety and supplemental water sources. Persons burning slash piles should, but are not required, have the following: leather gloves; shovels; suitable footwear; masks for covering the mouth and nose; and proper eye protection. As a courtesy, individual(s) planning the burning operation should notify adjacent landowners who may be affected by smoke, including the date, times, and exact location of the burn.

All Grand County permit holders must call the GCDNR for approval to ignite any pile each time they want to burn. Pile burning must be conducted under suitable weather conditions. The mountain valley area we live in provides perfect conditions for nightly cold air inversions which keep smoke and other air pollutants close to the ground by having warmer air above colder air at the ground surface acting as a “lid.” In the morning, the inversion can be broken if the sun is able to heat the surface enough to heat the air and get the layers to mix. In the evening as the sun goes down, the ground surface cools faster than the air above and the inversion is back. Due to this typical daily weather pattern, our burn “windows” generally run from 10 am to 4 pm. High pressure systems can hold these inversions in place creating poor smoke dispersal conditions for days or even weeks. State regulations require that Grand County may only allow burning when smoke dispersal ratings are Good or better according to the NOAA smoke dispersal forecast and/or chance of precipitation is greater than 70 %.

Slash piles may be ignited by several means. If the needles and fine fuels within the pile have dried through the summer, ignition can be easily accomplished with matches and a large ball of newspaper placed within the bottom of the pile. If fuels are still partially green, or the pile is wet from rain or melting snow, then a hotter and longer heat source may be necessary. Propane torches, kerosene, diesel fuel, sawdust soaked with diesel fuel or flares used for highway emergencies are common methods used to ignite piles. Do not use gasoline for this purpose.

Once you have received approval from GCDNR to burn, a test pile should be ignited to see if it burns and at what rate. The test pile also determines whether smoke management requirements can be met prior to igniting other piles. If suitable burning conditions exist, then additional piles may be started. Ignite only those piles that can be controlled by the available manpower and resources until they have burned down. You can slow the rate of burning (and possible scorching of adjacent trees) by shoveling snow or spraying water into the pile and cooling the fire down. As a general rule, one person can manage 3-6 closely situated piles. Grand County Ordinance 8 states that fires must be attended while flame is present, among other requirements.

After the piles have burned down, chunk-in any unburned slash and wood into the hot coals in the center of the pile. As much as 95% of the original slash can be consumed by aggressive chunking-in. At all times, piles may need to be actively mopped-up if the weather conditions will not extinguish the fire, or if the fires could escape. If high winds or melting snow increases this risk, then all burning materials must be mopped-up. 
Helpful Links to Grand County Services and Information
​Address Signs

The Upper Fraser Valley Community Wildfire Protection Plan reported that Winter Park Highlands has a serious problem with missing or inadequate individual home address signage. This is a major safety issue. Inadequate or hard to read signage makes it much harder for rescue or fire personnel to find a home quickly in the event of an emergency.  The CWPP recommends that every building have a permanently posted, reflective address marker mounted on a non-combustible pole. Signs should be made of fire-resistant materials (e.g. metal). The sign should be placed and maintained at each driveway entrance. Care should be taken to ensure that the location will not become obscured by vegetation, snow, or other features, whether natural or manmade. It is critical that the location and markings are adequate for easy night-time viewing.

As a benefit of membership in WPHA, the Association will install, at no charge to a member, a CWPP-compliant sign at the home of every member of the Association from 2011 forward.  The signs have been installed in county right-of-way at the end of each driveway on the right side standing five feet above ground level (after clearing the installation sites with the county locator service).  Here is what the signs look like:
​The horizontal number is the county road number and the vertical number is the house number.  Anyone who is not now a member of WPHA may obtain a sign as one of the many benefits of Association membership.  Click here for a membership application form-dues are $250 per year for developed lots or $125 per year for undeveloped lots --or we will install one without membership for $50.  Members receive a sticker on their signs identifying them as members.  Click here to order a sign without joining; mail your $50 check to WPHA, PO Box 275, Tabernash CO  80478-0275.

To date 292 signs have been installed. Our sign has become the standard for the county and is now being adopted by other homeowner associations. In fact, it has received attention from other counties around the state. Don't have one yet? Ordering information can be found in the preceding paragraph.
County Road/Street Name Correlation Table

Check out our helpful chart correlating county road numbers with the Highlands' own more charming street names.
>Community Wildfire Protection Plans

Winter Park Highlands is covered by three Community Wildfire Protection Plans (CWPP), the Grand County CWPP adopted in December 2006, the Upper Fraser Valley CWPP adopted in December 2007, and the Grand Fire Protection District No. 1 CWPP adopted in May 2009. The CWPPs were created pursuant to the federal Healthy Forest Restoration Act. Major purposes of each CWPP are to assess the level of risk of wildfires on a community by community basis in the county and to suggest steps that a property owner can take to enhance the likelihood that his or her property would survive a catastrophic wildfire.  All three Plans rate Winter Park Highlands as the second most hazardous community in Grand County (out of 24 assessed), which has been a major impetus for the mitigation work WPHA has pursued throughout the community since 2008 and continuing today. The Plans are invaluable resources and we encourage everyone to take advantage of the information in them.
>Grand County Wildfire Readiness Website

Check out the new Grand County wildfire readiness and survival website, www.bewildfireready.org.
Internet Service

Grand County Internet Service (a local internet company owned by Eden Recor), (970) 627-0034, admin@rkymtnhi.com 

Wild Blue, www.wildblue.com, (855) 627-2554

Dish Network, www.infinitydish.com, (888) 234-5981

Verizon Wireless Jet Pack (MiFi), www.verizonwireless.com

jssat, www.jssat.com

Winter Park Highlands Association does not recommend or endorse any particular internet provider.  Please check with each listed provider for further information and availability.
Operators Offering Snowplowing Services in the Highlands (in alphabetical order)
Matt Bailey 
Alpine Landscaping
(970) 887-9445

Chris Bergquist
Tabernash Construction Inc.
tabernash97@hotmail.com
(970) 726-0958
(970) 575-1122
(970) 887-3660

Cabin Works
(970) 887-1300

Jay Clough
(970) 726-9138

Jay Dekovic  
plowing9000@gmail.com
(970) 531-8588

Golden Eagle Snow Removal LLC 
PO Box 249, Winter Park CO 80482
Office (970) 726-9464
Office (970) 726-1104
Mobile (970) 531-4231
Golden Eagle Snow Removal LLC 
PO Box 249, Winter Park CO 80482
Office (970) 726-9464
Office (970) 726-1104
Mobile (970) 531-4231

Jim Holahan - Plow King
(970) 531-1109

Dave Miller
DMiller@granbypolice.com
(970) 531-3543

Ram Painting - Brian
(720) 333-2720

SSR Snow Removal
PO Box 2282
Granby 80446
(970) 531-9361
billysumerlin@wildblue.net

Wayne Thurston
(970) 531-2770

Kate Wright
(970) 531-6172
Matt Bailey 
Alpine Landscaping
(970) 887-9445

Chris Bergquist
Tabernash Construction Inc.
tabernash97@hotmail.com
(970) 726-0958
(970) 575-1122
(970) 887-3660

Cabin Works
(970) 887-1300

Jay Clough
(970) 726-9138

Captain D."Jimmy" Cohen (WPHA Member)
D.J.'s Fishing Guide & Recreation Services
P.O. Box 636
Tabernash CO 80478
Cell (970) 531-2622
More information under Classifieds

Jay Dekovic  
plowing9000@gmail.com
(970) 531-8588

Schleicher Construction LLC
Lucas: (303) 944-5364
lucas@schleicherconstruction.com
www.schleicherconstruction.com